This is how Top Restaurateur of Delhi does Community Service

Those who are in the food business or in the party scene of Delhi are familiar with the name of Umang Tiwari, a suave young Entrepreneur who is force behind some of the Hottest and Coolest Pubs, Bars and Restaurants of Delhi. Regular on Page 3 of Delhi’s dailies, he is often seen photographed in company of Cricketers, Musicians and Film personalities. Some of his popular creations being : Garam Dharam, Junkyard, Vault and Raas.

However today we are not talking about his exploits in the restaurant industry, but something he has done silently for last few years – feeding over a 1000 people every week – free of cost.

An ardent follower of Mahadev, he considers this as his way of giving back to the society.

The Bhandara or community meal is served every Saturday noon in Hauz Khas Village. Unlike the fancy food served at his restaurants this meal includes Puri, Chana, Aloo Subzi and Halwa – a traditional combination considered fit as offering to Gods and then savored as Prasad for devotees and followers.

He put this up for his friends, sharing the pictures from earlier today and I think it has achieved its purpose. We are inspired and hope some of you would feel the same too. Also its a pointer to good food – as fellow Foodiye will agree – Bhandara food is some of the best food you can put your hands on.. 😉

Laaphing – The Fiery Cold Tibetan Mystery : By Anuradha Gupta

As you walk inside the little Tibet in Delhi (Majnu ka Tila) you can’t help but notice these small tables where a lady/man is very meticulously almost in a Zen like state making some dish and people around are sitting in a equally calm state relishing it! 

As you move closer you see very neatly stacked yellow pancakes, some jugs with different colored liquid and orderly lined different salts. Everything is methodically arranged. You wonder is it Vegetarian, Noodles, Soup, Savory?

Laahing – Soupy version with gluten/soya granules

Meet Laaphing (Due to different accents, it can be spelled as Laphin, Lapin, Laping etc) – a super mysterious Tibetan street food you will find in our very own little Tibet (Majnu ka Tila) This dish is as much a mystery as this market is – very few people know about this insanely flavorful yet so simple dish, leave alone how many of them know what it is made of.

This is how their counter looks like
Residents of Majnu ka Tila savoring their share of Laaphin
They cut slices from this slab of starch
Soya Granules or Gluten. Not sure.
This is a cold starter/soup with slimy jelly like texture with burst of flavours. As you look at it in wonder what is this wobbly, squishy thing made of! 


Liang Fen as it is called in Sichuan Cuisine, it of two kinds: yellow and white. 

By the looks of it the the yellow laaphing is nothing but pancakes of starch, rolled with some gluten/soya, granulated salt, roasted chili paste, seasame oil, garlic paste and pinch of MSG in it and then chopped. But as they say looks can be deceiving, the exceptional amalgamation of such distinct flavors and the texture is simply mind blowing. It can be made using Potato, Mung Bean, Rice or Corn starch. 

That granulated salt, smokiness of red chili, the nuttiness of the sesame oil and the kick of garlic is nothing but an intoxicating blend of flavors. It is unlike anything in this world. And yes, while they are rolling the Laaphing {now I know why I love it so much – it is rolled ;)} but wonder is it the distant cousin of Gujju Khandvi.

Another version of Laaphing
You can have the soupy version of this, wherein they add some soy sauce, garlic water, rice vinegar and some more chili paste and trust me despite being cold noodle soup it warms up your soul and be careful with spice level, it can even make you sweat in this freezing cold. HELP The fairer version of laaphing seems to be made of the corn starch. Thick slippery slabs which resemble scallops topped with same spices minus the gluten. The white Laaphing is little more soft and melt in our mouth kinds.
Ready for take-away
Dry version of Laaphing
As you roam in the Tibetan market, you will find lots of people selling Laaphing but I love the guy who has a small shop opposite to the Rigo Restaurant. You can sit on small stools inside the shop, soak in the calm vibe and not help but get enchanted with reverberating Tibetan music! 

By the way this scrumptious and very exotic dish costs just Rs. 25. 

It cannot get more exciting than this, in a nondescript part of bustling Delhi – you can be transported to the super exotic, calm and very charming mini Tibet, MKT and get high on this International Sadakchaap glimmering beauty! 


Wriiten by Anuradha Gupta


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Food Enthusiasts of Delhi & Anuradha Gupta own the copyrights of all pictures and content. To use pictures OR content in any way commercially OR non-commercially connect with shashank@foodenthusiastsofdelhi.com.

Move over ‘Food-Truck’ – We have our own Food Cycles – Chhole Bhature in North Campus

Hudson Lines is a road dotted with numerous cafes – some of them Uber cool, some quirky and some plain commercial, all of whom along with chains and regular desi outlets are vying for the attention of the throbbing student populace living and studying in North Campus of Delhi University.
Chhole Bhature – The way they are served.
Amidst all the madness, there is this quiet cycle waala, standing outside the NDPL office and selling his wares. One look at him and my good food radar started beeping, and it beeped quite hard this time. Realized that this guy was selling Chhole Bhature, yup, good old chhole bhature in the land of mighty Chacha, Om, Rawalpindi and the likes. And surprisingly he had a crowd around him, a crowd which ensured that he was out of bhaturas at the time I reached and he was only able to offer me kulchas.
A look inside the Chhole Vessel
Drooling by the smell and sight I had to settled for the much humbler kulcha as I really wanted an insight into the Chhola that he was serving – because by the color, texture and smell – they seemed nothing less than amazing. And thankfully my feeling did not change once I started eating them – loaded with spices, however not going overboard, hot but just hot enough – these chholas instantly made me compare them to some of the best in the industry and for me it was a big deal for a guy selling from a bicycle. But then, I was still craving for them bhaturas.
Summer of 2014 was spent playing hide & seek with our guy, either I was there too early, or too late or on a day when he was not there. But advent of winters brought some luck for yours truly and he was able to grab those bhaturas couple of days back. Now let me warn you – these are not fresh made bhaturas which are fried on the spot, as we have come to know them, these are not soft, nor fluffy. These bhaturas are pre-made and are very thin. Before serving they are heated on a coal fired angeethi and served. It is a different school of bhaturas, the easiest examples I can sight are Sita Ram Dewan Chand from Paharganj and legendary Gole Hatti in Chandni Chowk as well as Patel Nagar.
Anyhow I eagerly got my plate served, for which I had to wait for 10-15 minutes as the guy takes his own sweet time serving and for Rs.20 a plate, this ended up being one of best Bhatura experiences I have ever had. The character that Coal fired angheeti adds to those bhaturas is something that is hard to explain.
Bhaturas being heated on coal fired Angeethi
And this the way these Bhaturas turn up, love that texture.
On Chhole he puts those beautifully spiced ginger julienne along with a chutney that is made sour from actual tamarind. In another dona he would give you some chopped onions, a piece of spiced potato and a pickled green chilly which goes so very well with the entire meal.
Chhole – ready to be served – notice the Ginger juliens and the Green Chutney with Tamarind.

 

what you get on the side – Potato, Green Chilli, Onions etc..
I would not recommend this place to everyone, however if you are someone who likes to eat bhaturas everywhere and can cherish the differences and contrasts without comparing it with the ‘Best’ you have ever had, then you MUST try this place out, you will not regret it for sure.
Entire show being manages from a simple Bicycle.

PS : And regarding the title – we are a country full of small time food vendors, on carts, cycles, foot or street – as romantic as the Food Truck sounds, lets not forget what we already have. Lets appreciate it, cherish it and like in this case savor it too.. 🙂

Food Enthusiasts of Delhi & Shashank Aggarwal own the copyrights of all pictures and content. To use pictures OR content in any way commercially OR non-commercially connect with shashank@foodenthusiastsofdelhi.com.

Where to eat Poori Chhole in Amritsar? – Food Trippin’

Poori Chhole is something which is very close to my heart, for me they are food for my soul. Last year when we went to Amritsar for our food trip, we ate them at Kanha Sweets and couple of morsels inside me, I proclaimed them the best I have had till date. However life is not always about the best, and I am someone who would appreciate some of the lesser known mortals too and give them a fair chance to compete for my taste buds and very valuable appetite.

 
So when a dear friend and food lover Jaideep Riar from Amritsar suggested that we do a poori and kulcha shootout on our trip to Amritsar this year, I jumped on the offer. The idea of trying 3-4 prominent poori waalas in the famed lanes of Amritsar was way too exciting for me to say no to.


Lead by Aman Kahlon and Jaideep Riar, we started our expedition with New Munim Di Hatti on lawrence road. Which unfortunately was a disappointment as they were not even making them puris that morning. They offered to source them from a shop behind theirs but we decided to give it a pass. Apparently I have been told that these guys have opened up a shop in some mall and that is where they sell their stuff now. Not Interested. Seriously.



Poori, Chhole, Aloo ki Subzi at Kanha, Lawrence Road

 

Fresh Pooris at Kanha

 

Next up was Kanha, where the puris were as good as I remember them to be. Served with Chhole and Aloo ki khatti meethi subzi, he still remains the best that is out there. Besides that his Gur waala Halwa is quite divine. Here I also must mention something called Satpura (sat-pura or seven puras). Many of you would confuse it with ‘Japanese samosa’ from Old Delhi, which is a mystery in itself for me. Its something that would look similar to a Puff or patty, however is nothing like it. Well, I have had it only couple of times, and both times at Kanha itself.


Satpura
Gur (Jaggery) ka Halwa
Gur ka Hawla at New Munim di Hatti, Lawrence Road
Basanti Halwa at New Munim hi Hatti, the name is attributed to Color.

 

Then we went to Kanhaiya which is Kanha’s next door neighbour, and his stuff was quite good as well. And like their names, their Poori-Chhole were quite similar to each other too, but Kanha still manages to take an edge for me.


Chhole Poori and Aloo ki Subi at Kahaiya sweets, Lawrence Road
Satpuras in a stack

 

From there we took the long hop all the way to Old City, right in the heart of action at Telephone Exchange area. Now this is a very interesting area, you can find a number of rehris selling kulche, Bhature, Pooris and other vegetarian stuff in the morning and noon time and as they day progresses the place is taken over by vendors catering to carnivore audience.

This expedition of ours was to Shera Poori Waala who sells his stuff from a cart / rehri near the telephone exchange. There is nothing fancy about him like Kanha or kanhaiya, however fresh, thin and crispy pooris served with very decent Chhole and Aloo ki subzi. If you like your stuff with no frills and zero fanciness quotient, then this is the place to be. Plus I am assuming it is not too far from Golden Temple and hence would be most easy for people visiting the city to reach and savor.
Poori Chhole Aloo at Shera Poori Waala, Near Telephone Exchange
Lassi waala next to shera, serving hand churned Lassis.
Another style of eating it, just add bit of thick curd on your chhole
Giant Poori made specially for us by Shera on request of Aman Paaji
Our last stop was a poori waala next to Laungan Devi temple in Rani Da Bagh area. His pooris came with Kaddu (Pumpkin), alooo and chhole. We all felt that his stuff was quite bland, but then I am biased against Poori and Chhole and cannot really call anything bad.
 
Poori, Chhole, Kaddu and Aloo outside Laungan Devi Temple

Poori, Chhole, Kaddu and Aloo outside Laungan Devi Temple
Waiting to be served
Madhup bhai, getting in the fresh stock
So when it comes to eating Pooris in Amritsar – First choice is Kanha for sure, however if you are bored of him or want to try something other than Kanha or do not want to travel to Lawrence Road, then you should head to Shera Poori Waala in Telephone exchange area.


 

Beyond Murthal – For Paranthas and more

Murthal has been on food scene of Delhi/NCR for quite some time. The Tandoori paranthe served in the area being part of legends and folklore now. For those unaware, its a place near Sonepat, around 40-60 km drive North of Delhi on NH1. The variation in distance depend on where you actually start from in Delhi/NCR. 

Parantha with homemade white from Sukhdev

And going against the popular choice and trend, I have never been a fan of any of the Dhabas famous in the area. I always found the paranthas to be overrated and feel that much better tandoori paranthas can be had at any random highway dhaba in Punjab or any-other highway dhaba in North India for that matter.

 

Paranthas at Gulshan

For me, it was always a place for people who have not had the ‘real’ stuff, and that stand still holds true after numerous visits to those Dhabas for various reasons. In past few months have tried Ahuja No.1, Sukhdev as well as Gulshan.

 

 

Out of the thee only Ahuja No. 1 managed to get any points from me and that too only in Aloo-pyaz paranthas, rest of the fancier sounding paranthas are best avoided. Sukhdev’s Puri-subzi in breakfast was quite nice, also loved their Halwa and Jalebi. Gulshan did not give me any reason to come back to them. 

Halwa at Sukhdev
Jalebi at Sukhdev
Jalebi at Sukhdev
Kheer at Sukhdev
Puri at Sukhdev
Puri with Chhole at Sukhdev

Murthal being home to some religious site, all Dhabas that operate there are pure vegetarian. You can always see almost a million vehicles parked there. Their USP being stuffed Tandoori paranthas which they serve with generous and sometimes copious (I don’t mind either :P) amount of white butter. Also the dal they serve is not like your usual kali urad ki dal, but is a mix of different dals and comes out greenish in color. I also like the dahi that they serve there, which is thick and tasty.

 

Rajma at Gulshan
White butter and Dahi at Gulshan
Jalebi at Gulshan

But then this post was about going beyond Murthal and trying to discover something other than the mundane (yes! Murthal is mundane for me now). And please do not suggest Haveli.

Taking the first step on this trip to Amritsar, we decided to find a Dhaba where actually trucks were parked rather than all the tourist cars and taxis. And we did stop at a no-name Dhaba few kilometers before Sonepat. At first glance it did not seem much, however the sight of several gruff looking truckers eating there gave me some hope.
On being asked what everyone eats, the waiter suggested dal, which we gladly ordered and was an obvious choice. Besides that we ordered Aloo Pyaz ke paranthe and Sev ki doodh waali subzi. Here I must tell you that I have had that subzi somewhere in Madhya Pradesh, however never in Delhi or surrounding areas. The food was decent enough with parantha costing Rs.30 per piece which seemed expensive for a moment. But then thinking about it, dhabas at Murthal which is not too far from there, charge Rs.30-40 for a single parantha too. 

Dal at the Random Dhaba
Sev ki Doodh waali Subzi

 

Paranthe at the Random Dhaba

 

Salad

 

Ready to Eat

However the real surprise came when we decided to stop at Gulshan Dhaba in Murthal to have another parantha each, as we thought they would be better than this random Dhaba. But to our surprise and disappointment, Dal and Paranthas at Gulshan refused to go down our throats as every morsel was reminding us of the previous Dhaba we ate at, reminding me of my reasons for not liking Murthal and why I always avoided that place in past as well.

Murthal offers a lot for a a family, a decent drive from Delhi, plenty of parking, plenty of options, basically an ideal place for a family long drive. Everything said and done, the food.. well.. its strictly average, and somethings lower than average as well. So whenever someone talks passionately about Paranthas at Murthal, I cannot help but think – Dude! you need to travel and explore more. Go Beyond Murthal.PS : Pictures have been clicked on multiple visits, at multiple outlets and under varied lighting conditions. Do not confuse the quality of picture with quality of food.

Where to eat Amritsari Kulcha in Amritsar? – Food Trippin’

The Eatlo gang  lead by Aman and Jaideep Paaji that raided all the Kulcha joints in this post.
As
legendary as Amritsari Kulcha is, it is something that we Dilliwalas
hardly understand. Not many of us know the real taste, texture or even
the idea of one. People confuse it with Stuffed Naan or Parantha all the
time, when the fact is that those two type of breads are completely
different from genuine Amritsari Kulcha.

 

Amritsari
Kulcha’s dough is made in a special way, with layers and then stuffed
with Aloo, Gobhi, Paneer etc. It is flaky, crispy and is served with
Chhole and Khatti chutney waale pyaz. Traditionally no raita or dal is
served with them, which is a common practice in Delhi these days.

 

And
generally speaking most of us have had so many bad versions for those
Kulchas that when we actually land in Amritsar, we eagerly lap up
whatever comes our way and consider it the best the city has to offer.
However with my recent interactions with Jaideep Riar and Aman Kahlon
from Amritsar, I realised that most of the places that get recommended
on Eatlo were the places frequented by tourists (read non-residents or
visitors to the city) and not many Ambarsaris actually go there to get
their fill of kulchas.

 

So
on this trip, we surrendered ourselves to Aman and Jaideep paaji, and
requested them to take charge of our Kulcha expedition and education.
And being the gracious punjabis they are, they helped us in sampling 4
of the top Kulcha makers that Amritsar has to offer.

 

1.
All India Famous – The one we tasted last year and the place from where
we started our expedition this year. This place was Nirvana for me,
this place served the best Amritsari Kulcha I had ever tasted. Amazing
by Delhi and rest of Indian standards for sure, but now I have tasted
better. Much better.

 

Location – Chungi crossing, Maqbool Road
Amritsari Kulche at All India Famous Kulche Wala – Maqbool Road

 

Mix of Chutney and onions – Some also call it ‘Khatta’

 

2.
Harbans Lal Kulche Waala – This is located in a small local market,
which looked kind of deserted to me or maybe we were there quite early
in the day. But then ‘Bansa’ as Harbans is popularly known amongst
locals had no shortage of patrons. And one bite into his kulcha, we knew
why. His Kulcha was considerably thinner, crispier and tastier than the
one we had at All India Famous.

 

Location – Old Market of Anand Avenue
Harbans Lal Kulche Wale – they do have a separate sitting area.
All I see is the swagger of a Amritsari Kulcha
Amtrisari Kulcha at Harbans Lal Kulche Wala

 

Amtrisari Kulcha at Harbans Lal Kulche Wala
3.
Ashoka kulche Waala – Now here Aman Paaji only made us sample a Kulcha
which was off the Menu and is called Paintee waala Kulcha (Rs.35
Kulcha). The Kulcha was stuffed with Gobhi, Aloo, Paneer, Tamatar etc
and though it was delicious, did not feel or taste like a Kulcha. It
reminded me of Chur Chur Naan that we get in Delhi. Aman told us that
today he (Ashokha) got over excited and over-stuff the kulcha. Probably
would try it again when I am there. The Chhole that he serves were much
better than any other outlet that I have tasted.

 

Location : A-Block, Ranjit Avenue (near Park)
Paintee waala special off the menu Kulcha

Regular Amritsari Kulche at Ashoka, notice the difference in shape compared to others.
Amritsari Kulche ready to be served

Most delicious chhole of all the ones we tasted that day.

 

4.
Monu Kulcha Corner – Now this seemed to be a long drive for us, atleast
by the Amritsari standards but then I cannot be a good judge of
distance as I had no clue where I was, or where I was being taken. We
were there on a Saturday and while driving Jaideep Paaji told me that
last Sunday he went to Monu for Kulchas and he was 57th in queue to be
served. Yup, Monu had 56 other orders to cater too, before he could have
served Jaideep Paaji. And once we had our Kulchas infront of us, we
knew why someone who was so off the grid, someone literally out of the
city limits was doing so well for himself. His Kulcha was the crispiest
and tastiest amongst all we had tasted that day. Though the chhole at
Ashoka were a tad better, but then the Kulcha itself made up for
everything.

 

Aman
paaji tells me that Monu used be operate from a place called Chitta
Katra in the walled city and was quite famous there. However now he has
got his own shop and the new location also gives him a better paying
clientele.

 

Location : Take a turn on Loharka Road from NH3, go for 1.5 km approximately and Monu would on your Left hand side.
Amritsari Kulcha at Monu Kulche wala – The Best of the lot.

Amritsari Kulcha at Monu Kulche wala – The Best of the lot.
Amritsari kuchas of a different type

Getting ready to roll

 

Rate list in Punjabi
at Monu Kulche waala

 

Now
I am sure that we have managed to touch only tip of the iceberg when it
comes to Kulchas in Amritsar. However considering that tip was actually
the top shown to us by Dr. Aman Kahlon and Jaideep Riar, both of whom
are local to Amritsar and super foodies in their own right and the fact
that these joints are not on tourist trail and they cater to actual
Ambarsaris, I feel pretty safe in saying that the above mentioned
Kulcha joints are best that Amritsar has to offer.PS : Working on pictures I realized that the rate list at Monu Kulche Wala is written in Gurmukhi (Punjabi) and no English or Hindi translation is there. Do we need more proof that there is nothing about this shop that is geared to cater to tourists or non locals ?? 😛Connect with me on Twitter : @SH_AGer

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Food walk in Old Delhi – Exploring Sita Ram Bazaar

To stay informed about our outings and other activities please join us on our Facebook Page. For more information about FED Raids, click here
My love for the walled city is quite known, as mentioned earlier, that place makes me feel like Alice in wonderland. Hence I always cook up excuses and look for opportunities to visit that part of the town. And what better time there is to walk those famed food lanes than in the month of December. The well settled winter chill coupled with possibly the best time to be out basking in the warm sun, we zeroed down on a perfect December afternoon.
Swooping on the heady combination available, a FED raid was called for and a bunch of Food Enthusiasts assembled at the Chawri Bazaar Metro station. This raid was dedicated to explore Sita Ram Bazaar, one of the lesser known lanes of the walled city; however it is also the lane that I end up visiting most often. My regular visits can be attributed to my Aunt, who lives there with her family.
What probably very few people know about the Old Delhi food trail is the fact that this particular part of the city, famed for its kebabs and biryanis, also houses lanes that are an absolute delight for a vegetarian. Chawri Bazaar and Sita Ram Bazaar, strongholds of the Hindu trading communities are areas that are traditionally pure vegetarian. As far as I know, even eggs are a very recent addition to the food scene there. This happens to be the area from where the famous Chat, Kachori, Samose, Bedmi, Nagori, Gol Gappe, Kulfi etc of walled city hale from.
The Sita Ram Bazaar food walk that day was quite an ad hoc for experience for me as well. I knew the lanes like the back of my hand but what I was not sure of was which vendors would be serving at that time of the day? Was Sunday the day I would find all that I had sampled previously? Would my regular guy be there or would we miss him by an hour or so? However there was one thing I was pretty sure of and that was the fact that we would not be disappointed. The happy smiles throughout ensure that I don’t need to emphasize of this point at all.

While waiting for other foodies at the metro station, the temptation to have Ram Laddoos of the hawker standing right next to gate number three was hard to resist. Though they were not extraordinary but totally succulent and with the right amount of salt and spices and worth the moolah and the long wait. However as I often say, even the average food you get in those lanes is better than the good food elsewhere.

Ram Laddoo, all dressed up 😛

 

Ram Laddoo outside the Metro Station
Food Enthusiasts waiting to embark on the Expedition

Post the Ram Laddoos we started our expedition, and decided to give a skip to the Ashok Chat this time. Been there, done that way too many times. But Hey! May be next time :D. Our first stop was a cart selling Kachoris. I am sure many of us love our drinks, however a night of heavy drinking always leaves a bad taste in mouth the morning after. And that is where Kamal Kachori waala’s claim to fame comes from. He is the only vendor that I know who serves his kachoris with chhole, instead of the usual aloo ki subzi. His chhole are known to be super spicy, making them extremely popular among people suffering from ‘morning after’ taste buds. But don’t lose heart, you can find pure joy and delight on any given day with or without the hung-over taste. The heat of the red chilli ‘tadka’ in the chhole and the strong and potent smell of heeng from the kachori would be enough to open up and assault your sinuses. Quite understandably one of the best and the most hit item we sampled that day all I can say is that I cannot wait to get back there and stuff myself silly with those kachoris.

Harjeev enjoying the Kamal’s Kachori
Pallavi found the flavors to be too difficult to resist.
To stay informed about our outings and other activities please join us on our Facebook Page. For more information about FED Raids, click here. Next in queue for the foodies was Chhole Bhature which is not technically a walled city specialty. My past experience with this Chhole Bhature waala (Near Lal Darwaza) was decent and this time as well he did not disappoint. Though not at par with the best in business, however still edible.

Quite surprisingly the lanes were choc-a-block with people selling Daulat ki Chat; however I have been warned time and again against having it from any of them due to various reasons. Luckily Gali Arya Samaj in Sita Ram Bazaar has the best Daulat Ki Chat waala in business. For those of you who are wondering what Daulat ki chat is, it is basically milk froth mixed with khoya. Froth is made by whipping the milk for a long time, and then powdered sugar and khoya are added to it before serving. It’s a winter delicacy and an extremely light dessert. Kalakand came next on list, coming straight from the Kadhai of another vendor with a small unnamed shop in the same lane. It was fresh and delicious.

Frech batch of Kalakand being prepared
Kalakand from the last Batch

Unable to think of anything else to eat in that gali, we decided to move towards Kucha Pati Ram, home to legendary Kude Mal Kulfi waala. However instead of taking the conventional route, we took another ‘exotic’ route and stumbled upon a shop selling Kachori and Samosa. How was it different? They had two varieties of Samosas, one stuffed with Mutter (Peas) and the other with Gobhi. The mutter samosa was quite a revelation, and also quite a hit. It is the season for peas and hence they were quite sweet, tender and flavorful. Mixed well with the right spices they are a potent combo for the taste buds.

Mutter Samosa
Kachoris and  Samosas
It was no surprise that Kude Mal, once again turned out to be highlight of the day. Just imagine 25 foodies, jostling with each other for every piece of kulfi that was available. From Anaar, Phalsa, Jaamun, Aam, Kiwi to Paan, Fruit Cream, Classic Kulfi, Aam Panna and Kala Khata, you name it and we had them all.
Unfortunately there was only person who was serving us, and before he could scoop out an entire kulfi from the can, it was already gone. But after having 40 kulfis in all, we had no reason to complain. And what was absolutely as delightful as the kulfis themselves was the fact that all of us took the Old Delhi lanes and got back to our childhood, quite literally. I don’t remember the last time all of us created such a racket to sample something. Jostle, jump and tug for something with all our heart and not once not twice but forty almost times like a bunch of over enthusiastic kids.

The final stop of the evening was in Chawri Bazaar for Veg Kathi Kebabs and Rumali Rotis. This is something that again one does not find on a daily basis in walled city, and luckily for us, we were there on a Sunday. Maybe I love that stuff too much because I am yet to have a Kathi Kebab that I did not like. That said most of my experiences of eating it have been in walled city as well. Average food found within the walled city is more often than not better than the good food found elsewhere ;-).

Veg. Kathi Kebab being prepared

The joy of being there that Sunday afternoon and the joy of revisiting that experience to pen it down is as good a conclusion as I can come up with for this post. Old Delhi lived to its promise, it sprang up some surprises and least of all it managed to delight one and all. Asking anything more is asking too much.

Food Enthusiasts of Delhi – The Happy Bunch
PS : Besides good food, the super-awesome company took the experience to all new high.

Written by Shashank Aggarwal, with support from Pallavi Shahi.

 
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